As seen in The Intelligent Collector

For years, textiles were overlooked by the art and auction worlds, except for certain types of pieces or those with historical significance.

“It used to be that auctioneers would go through a house, and they’d look for the jewelry, they’d look for the silver, they’d look at the paintings. They would open up closets, and they would close it and say ‘Nothing else in here.’ They don’t do that anymore. It’s an asset and everybody is realizing that,” says Deborah Miller, a textile and clothing appraiser who’s appeared on PBS’s Antiques Roadshow.

Textile collections are growing in importance, whether it’s ethnographic art, fine rugs, fashion, sports or other objects. Growing interest means growing value, and the sometimes-fragile nature of textiles means care and protection take extra work. 

MIND THE MOTHS
Several types of insects can damage clothing and textiles, says Doug Greenberg, vice president of sales and marketing at Garde Robe, a luxury and museum-quality clothing storage firm. Moths, carpet beetles, silverfish and bedbugs are often found among pieces stored in home attics and basements, or in other standard-storage environments.

Please click here to read the full article.  To learn more about proper garment care and prevention against moth damage, please click here.

As Seen In